rss search

Inspiration

line

At the Beginning

Posted by on Apr 8, 2014 in Writing Advice, Un-Truths | 0 comments

At the Beginning

Where better to begin than at the end? Maybe it seems like cheating, to know the end at the beginning. That would be the case if we were like King of Hearts in Alice in Wonderland, who said to the White Rabbit, “Begin at the beginning, and go on till you come to the end: then stop.” I have in mind, however, an ending more in line with one of Stephen Covey’s habits — Habit #2, in fact, “Begin with the end in mind.” As Covey writes, all things are created twice: first in the mind, and then in the world. It is a little outside his meaning, but:...

read more

“I Remember You,” by Roger Ebert

Posted by on Apr 12, 2012 in Memoir, Quotes | 0 comments

“I Remember You,” by Roger Ebert

This article, written by Roger Ebert, appeared originally on “Roger Ebert’s Journal.” I’ve copied its entirety here, rather than providing a link, because links expire – which is somewhat ironic, really, since this essay is about being remembered. The emails have been arriving with depressing regularity. Often the subject line is only the name of a friend. With dread I know what the message will contain: That person has died. In recent weeks there have been seven such losses. Three came in a 10-day period, and I...

read more

Approval

Posted by on Mar 27, 2012 in Just Fun, Un-Truths | 0 comments

I wrote this story in response to NPR’s “Three Minute Fiction” contest. The first sentence is mandatory; the length is limited to 600 words. I hope you enjoy the story (and perhaps the essay of reflections I wrote a bit later). She closed the book, placed it on the table, and finally, decided to walk through the door. Within a few steps she had moved from the comfortable, wooden world of the library into the tiled grayness of the government office. There were four service windows, but only the rightmost window was occupied. The man behind the...

read more

The “Yes” Session

Posted by on Feb 20, 2012 in Writing Advice | 0 comments

The “Yes” Session

The one thing we know for certain about creativity is that it’s fragile. Since we don’t know where it comes from—and don’t know where or why it goes—we’d be well advised to treat it well when it’s here. At the inaugural meeting of a new writers’ group on Saturday, exactly how to help each other was the question of the hour. Writing is intensely solitary, taking place almost entirely within the skull of one person. How can we help each other without being negative? Critics like to talk about “constructive criticism”—does such an animal exist?...

read more

A Gathering of Introverts

Posted by on Nov 8, 2011 in Images, NaNoWriMo | 1 comment

A Gathering of Introverts

This past Saturday – November 5th – I was able to answer the question: What happens if you bring together a bunch of introverts? Saturday was the first (of two) meetups for the local group of National Novel Writing Month participants, or TC Wrimos. The group met in the basement level of Horizon Books, one of the last substantial independent bookstores in our region, for six hours of writing en masse. There was plenty of talking amongst the writers (or writing amongst the talkers), but by wrap-up at 9:00 pm (I had to leave at 6:00...

read more

It was a dark and stormy … month

Posted by on Oct 20, 2011 in Writing Advice, NaNoWriMo | 0 comments

It was a dark and stormy … month

The slogan: “Thirty days and nights of literary abandon!” November is coming, and the ever-shorter days mean that it’s time again for National Novel Writing Month – or “NaNoWriMo.” It’s a mostly- (but not entirely-)online assemblage of writers and non-writers and wanna-be-writers, who join a collective national effort to write, in the space of one November, a novel of 50,000 words. Does it need to be a classic? Does it need to be good? Does it need to have any actual readers? The answer to each of these question is a firm No! NaNoWriMo is...

read more

Elmore Leonard’s 10 Rules for Writing

Posted by on Oct 14, 2011 in Writing Advice | 0 comments

Elmore Leonard’s 10 Rules for Writing

Elmore Leonard started out writing westerns, then turned his talents to crime fiction. One of the most popular and prolific writers of our time, he’s written about two dozen novels, most of them bestsellers, such as Glitz, Get Shorty, Maximum Bob, and Rum Punch. Unlike most genre writers, however, Leonard is taken seriously by the literary crowd. What’s Leonard’s secret to being both popular and respectable? Perhaps you’ll find some clues in his 10 tricks for good writing: 1. Never open a book with weather. If it’s only to create...

read more